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Continuity Features

  1. Store details about the story in the following sections: Manuscript, Plotlines, Characters, Outfits, Props, and Locations.
  2. Keep track of character costume changes throughout the story.
  3. Analyse the manuscript, looking at Structure, Conflict, Pacing, Grammar, Setting, Point of View, Dialogue, Protagonist, Antagonist, and Timeline.
  4. For editors, a style elements section allows you to keep track of important editing details, as well as producing an A-Z style-sheet of terms.
  5. A Facts section allows you to keep track of story elements that need to be verified (such as historical dates and event timelines).
  6. Reports can be printed or saved to PDF. Reports can also be saved to Rich Text Format (RTF) for use in your other programs.
  7. Import character, prop, and location details from Subplot.
  8. Import character details from Character Folio.
  9. Import plotline details from Plotline.

 

Continuity works like a tabbed binder that allows you to enter details about a story in the following sections: Manuscript, Plotlines, Characters, Outfits, Props, Locations, and Notes.

 

The Manuscript section of Continuity is further broken down into the following subsections: Summary, Style Sheet, and Facts, with an additional Notes and Analysis section detailing Structure, Conflict, Pacing, Grammar, Setting, Point of View, Dialogue, Protagonist, Antagonist, and Timeline.

 

Continuity also includes a set of checklists that can be used and customised for each of the plotlines, characters, outfits, props, and locations entered. Checklists are sets of questions/challenges for you to consider and complete when assessing a story element. Each time you add a new plotline, character, outfit, prop, or location, the relevant checklist details are copied over, ready to be completed.

 

Use Continuity alongside your manuscript draft, and keep track of what the reader knows about your characters and situations, which is often far less than the information you have at your disposal as the writer. For example, as the designer of your heroine, you may know she has blonde hair and a fear of spiders, but what has the manuscript told the reader? Has your crucial piece of evidence for your murder-mystery been placed for the reader to find before the final showdown?

 

Please note: Continuity is a tool to help writers and editors analyse a manuscript, it is not a word-processor.